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Best Turducken Recipes

Best Turducken Recipes

Turducken Shopping Tips

Make sure you have all the recipes you are going to make ahead of time. Compile your grocery list from those recipes a week in advance. Make sure you allot enough time for the turkey to defrost.

Turducken Cooking Tips

Balance the amount of dishes prepared ahead and those put together last minute – serve cold dishes made in advance as well as items straight from the stove.


Traditional Louisiana Turducken

For those not intimately acquainted with this meat masterpiece, the turducken consists of a de-boned chicken stuffed inside a de-boned duck stuffed inside a de-boned turkey. Each layer is padded with stuffing. This new beast is then prepared as a traditional turkey would be: roasted, braised, fried, grilled, barbecued, it's up to you. In its glory days, the turducken was popularized by the great Chef Paul Prudhomme, but no one is exactly sure who invented it. We do know it originated in the specialty meat stores of South-Central Louisiana. There is some evidence that it may have found its American origins in a meal created by the unnamed owner of Corinne Dunbar's, a Creole restaurant in New Orleans.

But the tradition of putting birds into other birds can be traced back to earlier European history. One of the most notable being the rôti sans pareil consisting of 17 different birds starting with a garden warbler and ending with a bustard made in 1807 by Grimod de La Renière for a royal feast. This is still not the oldest evidence of the tradition. Similar creations were made by the Romans. There is also Kiviak, a traditional Christmas dish from Greenland that consists of defeathered seagulls wrapped in a freshly-disemboweled seal carcass, which is then buried and left for months to ferment. Ok, that one may be a bit of a stretch.

While its past can be debated it's safe to say that the future of the bird-within-a-bird-within-a-bird is in America. Some chefs have taken the recipe and made it bigger (the American way) by adding a small pig into the mix - it essentially swallows the turducken and is then cooked. Others have tamed the monster and made it more elegant. The Quaduckant is the upscale version consisting of a quail stuffed in a duck stuffed in a pheasant. The fowl-based Frankenstein monster may be viewed as a symbol of American decadence, but its history suggests so much more, so eat up and know you're participating in a great tradition.

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How To Make The Ultimate Turducken | The Food Lab

Ever since I was a wee little cook ripping up my first chives, burning my first steaks, and toughening up my first squid, I'd dreamt of poultry-stuffed-poultry-stuffed-poultry. The idea of a Turducken—a chicken stuffed into a duck stuffed into a turkey—is just so damn appealing. How could three such glorious birds not taste all the more glorious together?

Kirby-esque visions of ducks sucking up whole chickens, acquiring their powers, only to be sucked up by a turkey to create one mega-bird danced through my eyes. I could taste their fats co-mingling on my palate.

The history of the turducken is relatively modern. Some attribute it to Paul Prudhomme, the legendary Louisiana chef who also brought us blackened fish, while others say it was first made at Hebert's Specialty Meats, also in Louisiana, but all place its time-stamp at somewhere in the 1980's. But as a concept, animal-stuffed-animal roasts have a pedigree that reaches back at least to Roman times, when roasts could use as many as two dozen different beasts of ever decreasing size. How romantic.

Part of the appeal is the surprise. A perfect turducken should arrive at the table looking just like a regular old turkey. It's only upon carving that guests are given the first clue: rather than trying to navigate the confounding curves of a breast bone, a carving knife slides cleanly, smoothly through the entire boneless wonder, exposing the layered meat and stuffing within.

I so wanted to make one, so make one I did.

The dream all came crashing down within the first few bites.

Sure, that turkey-esque beast looked impressive on the table, its misshapen sides bulging out like uncooked bagel dough, cornbread and sausage stuffing comingling inside with no attention paid to the boundaries the various birds were supposed to be setting up in there. But there was no way that even the most optimistic of holiday feasters could have pretended it was as tasty as roasting each of the birds individually.

Here's a picture of what the Food Lab was doing, circa 2004:

Gorgeous, right? Grandpa in the back is keeping mum.

The turkey was dry as a bone, the duck skin completely unrendered, fatty, and chewy, the flavors a mish-mash of competing ingredients. I, along with my entire family, ate the thing, smothered in gravy, washed down with plenty of red wine and hubris.

I chalked it down to poor preparation, and spent the next couple of years trying to perfect my technique—cooking at a lower temperature, trussing and stuffing more carefully—but kept the same basic method intact. Things never got significantly better.

Then, in 2007, I came to an even more shocking realization after tasting every major brand of mail-order turducken available: They were all dry.

Here's are the basic problems with turducken:

  • Dry turkey and overcooked duck. Poultry needs to be cooked to between 140°F and 150°F*. Below that, and it's got a mushy texture and is dangerous to consume. Let it heat up above that, and it dries out irretrievably. How do you cook a chicken in the very center of a duck and a turkey to 140°F without overcooking the turkey or duck? You don't. In every recipe I tried, the turkey ended up hitting upwards of 170°F by the time the chicken was cooked through.
  • Misshapen appearance. It's not easy to wrestle with three birds and three layers of stuffing. No matter how carefully you truss or tie, it ends up kind of. blob-like. Rather than opening neatly when sliced, it sort of spills out, as it the turkey skin were a sand-stuffed ballon.
  • The duck skin is too fatty. As water-dwelling creatures, ducks have a ton of fat for insulation. Duck fat doesn't start to render until well above the temperatures that you want to cook either duck or turkey meat to, which means that once it's stuffed inside the turkey, it stays there, rubbery, fatty, and unappetizing.
  • The flavors are muddled. Three birds, three different stuffings (one in the chicken, one between the chicken and duck, one between the duck and turkey), it's impossible to get a clear, clean, flavor out of the chimeric beast.

*The USDA recommends significantly higher temperatures for roast poultry, but given proper resting, 150°F is perfectly safe.

My goal for the last few years has been to try and solve every one of those problems. This year, I finally succeeded, producing what is perhaps the finest roast to ever emerge from my oven. Turkey meat that gave its juice away freely to anyone who asked. Perfectly rendered duck fat, tender to the teeth. And flavors that blended as harmoniously as robotic lions joining forces to save the universe.

The Basics: Boning Birds

The most difficult part of a turducken is boning out all the birds. With the chicken and the duck, this means removing every single bone while still keeping the skin in one intact sheet. Seems like an impossible task, but it's in fact remarkably simple once you get the hang of it.

The key is to realize that you barely use a knife at all. The knife is used to remove the wish bone, to slit the back, to cut the joints at the wings and thighs, and to scrape meat from the leg bones. That's all. Everything else is done by hand.

The turkey, on the other hand, should have its leg and wing bones left in so that it still looks like a turkey after it's roasted, like this:

For full step-by-step details on how to do it, just check out the slideshow here.

Once all that's done, we come to the question of stuffing.

The Stuffing

Classic New Orleans-style recipes call for three different stuffings in the birds. There's no strict rule as to what they are, but they usually involve a cornbread stuffing, a rice stuffing, and an oyster-based stuffing. I've tried all of those, as well as a classic sage sausage bread-based stuffing, one with dried fruits, and a few other variations in between.

At first, I thought the problems with the stuffing were limited to simply balancing flavors—a tough task in and of itself. Eventually, I realized that the stuffing was part of the problem when it came to the structural integrity of my roast.

See, while meat is made of strongly interconnected proteins that set into shape as you cook them, stuffing has no such shape-holding power. Even in a fully roasted turducken, that stuffing is soft and malleable, causing the bird to deform (and therefore cook unevenly), and looking totaly unattractive as it spills out onto the cutting board upon carving, like a late night partier reacquainting himself with his dinner on the sidewalk.

So if a grain-based stuffing is the problem, why not just switch to an all-meat stuffing? Forcemeats like sausage or pâté are common stuffing choices in classical French preparations (like galantines or ballotines) for this very reason.

Swapping out my bread stuffing for sausage (I used bulk sage sausage) was a huge step in the right direction, instantly solving my flavor issues, though initial shaping of the bird was still not particularly easy.

For now, I decided to move on to getting the darn thing to cook evenly.

Even Cooking

The thing with roasts—and I apologize if you feel this is too obvious to even be worth mentioning—is that they cook from the outside in, and gradually approach the temperature of their surrounding environment.

This means that in a turducken placed in a 350°F oven, the turkey will always be closer to 350°F and therefore hotter than the chicken in the middle. Lower the temperature a little bit, and that differential between the chicken and turkey is reduced. Follow this to its logical extreme by cooking the turducken at the exact temperature you want to serve it at—in this case 145°F—and you can eliminate that temperature differential entirely. The chicken will be the exact same temperature as the turkey

But this poses a problem: It takes a long, long times for a big roast to equilibrate in a lower temperature oven. We're talking 12 to 16 hours at 150°F here, folks. That's a major commitment.

What's worse is that it's not safe. While a large, single piece of meat like a prime rib roast is clean and sterile on the inside and can thus be cooked low and slow with little to no risk,** this is not the case with a turducken: dangerous bacteria on the surfaces of the inner birds or in the sausage are trapped in an almost ideal environment for bacterial growth. I'm not squeamish when it comes to food safety, but even I'm not brave enough to eat 12 hour incubated chicken.

I'd have to find a better way.

Then it occured to me: if I wanted the inside to reach its final temperature at the same rate as the outside, why not just cook it from the inside out? The unique three-tiered structure of a turducken allows you to do exactly that.

Rather than stuffing a raw chicken into a raw duck into a raw turkey, this time I stuffed my chicken with sausage, and sealed it in a cryo-vack bag (I've used butcher's twine nearly as effectively). I then proceeded to poach it in warm water until the very center of the stuffing hit between the 140 and 145°F mark. I then immediately and rapidly stuffed the still-warm chicken inside the boned duck.

The par-cooked, sausage-stuffed chicken stays firmly in shape and is easy to handle, making wrapping the sausage-stuffed duck around it a relatively simple task (made even simpler if you use a plastic-wrap sling to help shape it). From there, the process is repeated—the chicken-wrapped-duck is vacuum-bagged (or trussed), and poached until the duck cooks through.

The great thing is that because the chicken is already warm when it goes into the duck, it stays that way as the duck cooks. You really only need to wait for the duck's stuffing to come up to 140 to 145°F, and ensure that the chicken and sausage in the center doesn't dip below 130°F during that process (there was not even a remote threat of this happening any time that I tried this method).

I zipped my poached ducken up inside my turkey (for this layer I skipped the sausage stuffing, since the turkey was already pretty full as-is), sealed the sucker with skewers (far easier than the awl-and-kitchen-twine method I've attempted in years past), trussed the turkey, and roasted it until the skin was a golden brown, and the turkey meat was at 145°F, again monitoring to ensure that the duck and the chicken stayed amply warm to avoid any danger of nasties breaking about (about 130°F).

The result was a burnished beauty that emerged from the oven looking just like a regular roast turkey, but revealing layer after layer of perfect cooked meat inside.

But one problem still remained: that confounded flabby duck skin.

Fortunately, this time I knew exactly what to do:

Just fry off the duck before wrapping it in the turkey. A good fifteen minutes worth of rendering and browning inside a skillet resulted in duck skin that was not only thin and completely tender, but also added some great flavor to the mix. It was so beautiful as-is, that I was almost tempted to serve the crispy ducken as a smaller roast in and of itself.

I'm now tempted to develop a recipe for a miniature Duck "Porchetta".

Added bonus: plenty of rendered duck fat to fry your potatoes in.

With that final tweak in place, I finally had it. This year, my Thanksgiving table is going to be graced with the ultimate Thanksgiving roast. A three-bird, four-beast, hedonistic extravaganza that not only looks and sounds impressive, but eats better than any turkey, duck, or chicken you've ever had.

I'm not going to lie: it's not a quick project, and it takes a bit of practice. Your first turducken may have some issues with its figure or internal alignment. But nail this recipe, and you will forever be known in your family as the king (or queen) of the holiday table.


Mini Turducken Recipe

Turducken is a meat creation made famous in Louisiana and it involves stuffing a whole deboned turkey with a deboned chicken stuffed with a deboned duck. If you’ve never been to Louisiana, chances are you’ve never heard of turducken but here in the south you just might see it on the Thanksgiving table. I decided to make a mini Turducken by using just the breast of these birds and it turned out way better than I envisioned. First, for this mini turducken recipe, I had to source the 3 birds. I found the chicken and duck breasts at my local Kroger but didn’t have any luck locating boneless, skinless turkey breast. I went ahead and bought a whole bone-in turkey breast and cut each side off the bone and removed the skin. Butterfly each breast so they’ll lay flat. In between each layer of meat this mini turducken has a layer of sausage or other type stuffing. I’m using a spicy pork sausage mixed with sautéed onion and mushroom for 1 layer, and a crawfish boudin sausage removed from the casing for the other. Use your imagination here I’ve seen some pretty creative and tasty ideas that really give the turducken flavor. To assemble the mini Turducken, stretch out plastic wrap over a cutting board and place the turkey breast down first. Spoon the spicy sausage mixture on the turkey and place the chicken breast down next. Top it with the crawfish boudin and finally the duck breast. Bring the edges of the turkey up and around and wrap the whole thing tight with plastic wrap. Notice I didn’t season anything at all. The spicy sausage and boudin have a plenty of flavor and the whole thing is going to get wrapped in bacon….Yeah I said Bacon! Rest the mini turducken in the refrigerator for a couple hours to help them form into a roast shape. (It would be ok to go overnight if needed). To cook the turducken fire up your smoker. I used my Big Green Egg with the plate setter for indirect heat. Add some wood to the hot coals for smoke I went with cherry for a lighter flavor. Bring the cooker to 275-300⁰ and let it stabilize. Stretch out a sheet of butcher paper over your work surface and build a 9࡯ strip bacon weave. Unwrap each turducken and place turkey side down (duck side up). Bring the bacon weave up and around the turducken and fold or trim the end pieces. Place each on a greased wire rack (my chicken racks work great) and place on the Big Green Egg. It’ll take a couple of hours to smoke these mini turduckens. After an hour, go ahead and insert a probe thermometer into the center to monitor internal temperature. I like to use the Thermoworks DOT – it’s works great. Turducken needs to cook to a minimum of 165⁰, so just keep a watchful eye on the temp and if the bacon gets too dark lay a piece of foil over it to stop the browning.

Using a Thermoworks Thermapen to verify the temps

When the alarm sounds, remove each turducken from the grill and rest for 15-20 minutes before slicing. These mini turduckens turned out incredibly tender and juicy. The sausages gave the breasts a spicy but not hot flavor, and you know the bacon just made it better. You can really get adventurous with this recipe to make it your creation. If you’re looking for a different idea on what to cook for the Holidays, give this recipe a try. Print

Place turducken in a heavy roaster. Roast at 300 degrees F. for 3 to 4 hours, until meat thermometer inserted in the very center of the chicken stuffing reaches 165 F. Baste once per hour with pan juices. If turducken begins to get too brown, tent loosely with heavy-duty aluminum foil that has been coated with vegetable spray.


Turducken with original stuffing recipes

Moist, Tender, Juicy Turduckens Stuffed With Louisiana’s Authentic Recipes

What is a turducken (Tur-Duc-Hen)?
A stuffed Turducken is a dish consisting of a deboned chicken stuffed into a deboned duck, which is in turn stuffed into a deboned turkey, hence the title.
The Turduckens are a legendary meat fest, seasoned to perfection. Each Turducken, a trifecta of turkey, duck, and chicken. A dish known as a roast without equals, incredibly tasty, bursting with flavor, with self-contained juices that seep through the inside, leaving it moist and meaty.

Why should I order from turducken.com?

  1. BEST PRICES ONLINE FOR TURDUCKENS
  2. FREE SHIPPING
  3. SIX AUTHENTIC DELICIOUS LOUISIANA STUFFINGS (WHEN INVENTORY IS AVAILABLE)
  4. PERFECTLY PRE-SEASONED WITH LOUISIANA SPICES
  5. NO PREPARATIONS, NO MESS
  6. READY-TO-COOK WITH BAKING INSTRUCTIONS
  7. MADE IN LOUISIANA
  8. SERVES 8 to 10 PEOPLE
  9. GUARANTEED TO ARRIVE FROZEN
  10. CUSTOMER SERVICE AVAILABLE MONDAY THRU FRIDAY FROM 8:00 AM TO 5:00 PM (CST).

All our turduckens are guaranteed to arrive fresh, and on time.
If your turducken arrived defrosted, or warm to the touch, it is no longer safe for consumption.

Send us an email with your order #, your telephone #, and the reason of your complaint. Once we receive your email, we will check your order and the shipping information provided by the shipping carrier. A replacement for your order will be shipped to you free of charge, or in some cases we will refund you for the amount of your purchase minus PayPal fees.

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What kind of stuffings do you use?
All Big Easy Foods Turduckens are Stuffed Turducken stuffed with New Orleans Style recipes like Cornbread, Creole Pork Sausage, Creole Pork and Rice, Cornbread & Pork Rice, and Louisiana Gulf Shrimp & Crawfish.

What makes your turducken so tasty?
Each Turducken is ready to cook, pre-seasoned and stuffed with a moist Louisiana original stuffing.

What does a turducken weigh on average?
All our turduckens sold on turducken.com weigh on average 12 to 15 pounds.

What does a turducken Roll weigh?
All our turduckens rolls sold on turducken.com weigh 4 pounds.

How many people does a 12lb Turducken feed?
Depending on size ordered – 10 to 15 normal people (or 8 REALLY hungry people)

How many people does a 4lb Turducken Roll feed?
4 to 5 people

Does the Turducken contain any MSG or preservatives?
No. It is prepared with all natural products.

Do you have a Gluten Free Turducken?
Due to the variety of products that we produce, some may contain traces of wheat, therefore, we cannot make any claims of our turduckens being gluten free.

Can you make a Turducken with no stuffing?
N0. The FDA approves all our turduckens and the recipes therefore, the recipes can not be modified, altered, or changed without receiving another approval, which may take several months.

Do you have a Turducken without pork
Yes. The Shrimp and Crawfish Turducken is the only one that does not contain Pork.

Is the Turducken spicy?
We use red peppers, cayenne peppers for only 2% seasoning and spices. It is well seasoned, flavorful, but not hot like hot sauce, or hot peppers.

Can I refreeze the Turducken?
If the turducken has been purchased through mail order, make sure it arrives frozen with a cold source in an insulated ice chest. Transfer it immediately to the freezer. If the turducken arrives warm, notify the company. Do not use the product.

Can I deep-fry a Turducken?
No. There are no bones to support it.

Can I grill or smoke a Turducken?
Yes. Set the Turducken on aluminum foil, so it does not stick to the grill or set in an aluminum pan. Make sure you have a lid otherwise it won't cook right. Put a thermometer inside the Turducken, make sure the internal temperature reaches 165kF. Throughout the cooking process make sure the grill or smoker temperature stays at 350 degrees F.

Why is turducken.com better?
Each of our TurDucKens are seasoned to perfection, then stuffed with one of a savory selection of original recipes, resulting in a sublime dish.

When should I order my turducken?
We make turduckens all year-long, but traditionally turduckens are served during the fall and the winter holiday season.
We will sell out, so don't wait too long to place your order. FedEx experiences heavy volume around Thanksgiving and Christmas, so we recommend placing your order no later than November the 20th for Thanksgiving, and December the 21st for Christmas.

How long can my purchase be kept frozen?
Products are generally good for 18 months if they are kept wrapped in an air tight bag and placed inside a freezer. The products must remain at a freezing temperature at all time. Once thawed, please follow instructions on the printed label.

How do I cook my partially deboned TurDucKen?
For best results, thaw in refrigerator for 48 hours.
Preheat oven to 400°F. Remove all plastic packaging, but do not remove the woven threading around the turducken. Add ¾ cup of water to the roasting pan, or for larger size roasting pan, fill the bottom with 1/2 to 3/4 inch of water. Cover, with legs pointing up.

If completely thawed , total cook time takes 3½ hours. If thawed: Preheat oven to 400˚F. Cook for 3 hours, uncover and continue to cook for an additional 30 minutes. basting from time to time until golden brown. Internal temperature should reach 165˚F.

If frozen , total cook time takes 4 hours, Preheat oven to 400˚F. Cook covered for 3½ hours, uncover and continue to cook for an additional 30 minutes. basting from time to time until golden brown. Internal temperature should reach 165˚F.

To serve: Use meat thermometer to insure your turducken has reached an internal temperature of at least 165˚F. Remove woven threading before serving. Carve the Tur-Duc-Hen down to the middle in one to two inch slices. Serve hot.

How do I cook my partially deboned TurDucKen in a convection oven ?
Convection oven to cook your 12 lb. Turducken


Step 5: Cornbread

Again we've rearranged this mini-recipe ahead of the other dressing recipes from the original Prudhomme instructions, since obviously, you need cornbread before you can make the cornbread dressing.

We doubled the ingredients in this recipe since we planned to make twice as much cornbread dressing.

This recipe makes 6 cups of cornbread:

* 1 and 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
* 1/2 teaspoon salt
* 2/3 cup cornmeal
* 1 and 1/3 cups milk
* 2/3 cup sugar
* 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
* 1/2 cup corn flour
* 1 small egg, beaten
* 5 teaspoons baking powder

Set the oven to 350 F (177 C).

Mix the flour, cornmeal, sugar, corn flour, baking powder and salt together in one bowl, while making sure that any lumps are broken apart. In a second large bowl, mix the milk, butter and egg. Blend this into the first bowl, while making sure everything is well mixed and all lumps are gone. Avoid overbeating.

Place the mix into a greased 8 x 8-inch baking pan and bake for 55 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven immediately and let it cool.


Ingredients

Instructions

Debone the chicken, starting by cutting alongside the backbone and following the rib cage around to the breastbone. Do the same from the other side of the backbone. Remove the flat of the wing completely and save for another cook. Cut around the bone of the wing drum, working your way toward the knuckle. Pull the bone out and slice free. Next, debone the thigh. Slice along the thighbone, down to the joint where the thigh meets the leg. Slice around the bone until it is freed. Then, slice around the knuckle of the leg drum, scraping the flesh away from the bone and working your way toward the end of the leg. When the bone is exposed enough to grab a hold of, pull it until it turns the meat of the leg inside out and slice the tendons to free the bone. Discard all bones.

Repeat the deboning process on the duck.

Repeat the deboning process on the turkey, with two exceptions. Leave the wing bones and leg bones in place.

Strain 1/4 cup Sweetwater Spice Classic Holiday Turkey Bath into a glass. Add 1/2 cup of cold water. Stir. Lay out the turkey, skin side down. Inject the breasts and tenderloins with the mixture. Season the flesh with the Cattleman’s Grill Ranchero Seasoning . Press a layer of stuffing over the meat, distributing evenly across the surface, and filling the leg and wing cavities.

Lay out the duck, skin side down, on top of the turkey. Season the duck with the Cattleman’s Grill Ranchero Seasoning. Press a layer of stuffing over the meat, distributing evenly across the surface, and filling the leg and wing cavities.

Lay out the chicken, skin side down, on top of the turkey. Season the duck with the Cattleman’s Grill Ranchero Seasoning. Press a layer of stuffing over the meat, distributing evenly across the surface, and filling the leg and wing cavities.

Pull the sides together, meeting where the backbone once was. Sew up the cut along the backbone using butcher twine and a large needle, or a FireWire cable skewer, making sure to go through flesh as well as skin, so it will not tear out. Sew up the ends (top and bottom cavities), to keep the filling from spilling out.

Place the turducken on a cooling rack over a sheet pan. Place in the refrigerator to dry out the skin overnight.

The next day, remove the second shelf, and preheat your Yoder Smokers YS640 pellet grill to 350°F. Remove the turducken from the refrigerator. Rub a thin layer of oil over the skin. Season the skin with Cattleman’s Grill Ranchero Seasoning. Cook the turducken on the cooling rack, over the sheet pan, on the main cooking grate, in the YS640.

When you achieve your desired color on the outside of (3-4 hours into the cook), tent a large sheet of foil over the turducken. Continue cooking until the internal temperature reaches 160°F. Rest 20 minutes before slicing to serve.


Turducken

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Bacon Wrapped Turducken Premium Roast - 3.3lb

$74.99 Price Includes Shipping

Our Bacon Wrapped Turducken Roast (small) [turkey-duck-chicken] is a unique, juicy and delicious product that combines our boneless turducken roast with bacon to deliver a "wow" taste experience.

These turducken roasts are composed of turkey thigh meat that is wrapped in bacon and layered with boneless, skinless chicken breast meat, boneless, skinless duck breast meat and stuffed with an Italian sausage mixture. The small roast serves 4 to 6 people.

Available with our original Italian sausage and seasoning. Every roast is totally boneless (no waste!) and packed with protein. When sliced, each serving provides a cross section of every component ensuring both a visual and taste sensation. It is perfect for small family get-togethers and special occasions like those around Thanksgiving and seasonal holidays, or ideal as an unforgettable tailgate feast.

See our handy Cooking Instructions for tips and preparation.

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Bacon Wrapped Turducken Premium Roast - 6.6 lb

$117.99 Price Includes Shipping

Our Bacon Wrapped Turducken Roast (turkey-duck-chicken) is a unique, juicy and delicious product that combines our boneless turducken roast with bacon to deliver a “wow” taste experience.

These turducken roasts are composed of turkey thigh meat that is wrapped in bacon and layered with boneless, skinless chicken breast meat, boneless, skinless duck breast meat and stuffed with an Italian sausage mixture. The large roast serves 10 to 12 people.

Available with our original Italian sausage and seasoning. Every roast is totally boneless (no waste!) and packed with protein. When sliced, each serving provides a cross section of every component ensuring both a visual and taste sensation. It is perfect for family get-togethers and special occasions like those around Thanksgiving and seasonal holidays, or ideal as an unforgettable tailgate feast.

See our handy Cooking Instructions for tips and preparation.

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Echelon Foods Turducken – Italian Sausage

$144.99 Price Includes Shipping

Our Echelon Foods Turducken™ is a tasty beast. De-boned duck and chicken breasts are wrapped up with Italian sausage stuffing into a whole turkey, also deboned except for wings and drumsticks. Serves 12 - 15 Adults. Thaw, pop it into your oven, bake without basting, and then serve it to your guests with no need to carve or throw away bones! Easier than toasting bread, yet impressive and festive enough for any occasion.

See our handy Cooking Instructions below for tips and preparation.

Once prepared, amaze your dinner guests as you effortlessly slice off perfect portions from a completely boneless bird . slabs of pure meat sure to delight everyone at your table.

Cooking Instructions

Turducken

(Please calculate approx. 0.6 - 0.9 lbs (0.3 - 0.4 kg) per person.)

For printer-friendly instructions, please click here .

To defrost, you can simply thaw your Turducken in the refrigerator for 5 days or for rapid thawing place in sink or bucket with running cool water for 24 - 36 hours.

1. Low Temperature Cooking - Conventional Oven (Most Popular Method)

  • Heat oven to 220°F. Place the bird on a rack and put it in an oven pan and set it in the centre of the oven and bake until internal temperature exceeds 165°F. Cooking time: Internal temperature is the best indicator. As long as it takes for the internal temperature to exceed 165°F is how long it takes for your turducken to cook. Please allow approx. 60 - 75 mins per kilogram. e.g. an 11lb (5 kg) Turducken may take up to 7 hrs.Note: there’s no need to baste or cover with foil, although many of our customers do prefer to have their turducken covered in foil for the first 2 - 4 hours of cooking. If bird is not elevated on a rack, accumulated drippings may have to be removed from the pan every few hours so that the lower portion does not deep fry in the hot oil.

2. Slow Cooker - 'Crock Pot'

  • Set slow cooker to 'high'. Place your turducken inside and close the lid. After 1.5 -2hrs change setting to 'low' and cook until internal temperature exceeds 165°F. Cooking time: Internal temperature is the best indicator. As long as it takes for the internal temperature to exceed 165°F is how long it takes for your turducken to cook. Please allow approx. 60 - 75 mins per kilogram. e.g. an 11lb (5 kg) Turducken may take up to 7 hrs.

3. Barbeque - Outdoor Grill

  • Ensure propane tank is full. Light grill. For best results keep one burner switched to OFF. (Ex, one a two burner BBQ keep one side off on a three burner BBQ keep the middle burner off.) Bring temperature inside grill up to a constant 220°F. Place foil wrapped turducken directly above the burner that has been switched off so it is not over direct flame. Close lid and cook until internal temperature exceeds 165°F. Cooking time: Internal temperature is the best indicator. As long as it takes for the internal temperature to exceed 165°F is how long it takes for your turducken to cook. Please allow approx. 60 - 75 mins per kilogram. e.g. an 11lb (5 kg) Turducken may take up to 7 hrs.Note: Many BBQs are difficult to ensure a constant temperature. Check frequently for high flames and flare ups. Check internal temperature often.

4. High Temperature Cooking - Conventional Oven

  • Heat oven to 350°F. Place the bird on a rack and put it in an oven pan, or if you don't have a rack - cut up a couple of carrots, onions and celery, put in an oven pan, place your Turducken on top of the veggies, add some white wine and water in and set it in the centre of the oven and bake until internal temperature exceeds 165°F. Cooking time: Internal temperature is the best indicator. As long as it takes for the internal temperature to exceed 165°F is how long it takes for your turducken to cook. Please allow approx. 30 - 45 mins per kilogram. e.g. an 11lb (5 kg) Turducken would take up to 4 hrs.Note: Using a high temperature we recommend basting the Turducken during its roasting time every ½ hour to keep it nice and moist. Use its own drippings mixed with water and white wine.

IMPORTANT NOTES: Your Turducken is fragile when hot. This bird has no bone structure to hold it shape. Be sure to keep it on or in it’s cooking container. Remove the Turducken carefully from the oven/grill/slow cooker cover immediately in foil and allow it to rest for at least 30 min before moving or serving. Meanwhile, you may want to make some gravy with some of the drippings. With strong spatulas inserted underneath (remember there are no bones to support the bird’s structure), carefully transfer the Turducken to a serving platter or cutting board. Remove the stitching by pulling on one end of the twine while holding the Turducken and present it to your guests before carving. Be sure to make your slices crosswise so that each slice contains all three meats. Please refer to carving diagram on the label.

Nutritional Information

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Echelon Foods Turducken – Chicken Apple

$144.99 Price Includes Shipping

Our Echelon Foods Turducken™ is a tasty beast. De-boned duck and chicken breasts are wrapped up with chicken apple sausage stuffing into a whole turkey, also deboned except for wings and drumsticks. Serves 12 - 15 Adults. Thaw, pop it into your oven, bake without basting, and then serve it to your guests with no need to carve or throw away bones! Easier than toasting bread, yet impressive and festive enough for any occasion.

See our handy Cooking Instructions for tips and preparation.

Once prepared, amaze your dinner guests as you effortlessly slice off perfect portions from a completely boneless bird . slabs of pure meat sure to delight everyone at your table.

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All Natural Duck Leg Confit-Fully Cooked - 6 lb

$127.99 Price Includes Shipping

All Natural Duck Leg Confit - Fully Cooked - 6 x 2 packs (12 legs x 8 oz/leg)
Total 6 lbs (12 legs total)
Fully Cooked

Product Description:
Duck Legs that are seasoned with garlic, onion and spices then slowly cooked in their own fat, our All-Natural Duck Leg Confit from Maple Leaf Farms offers a gourmet meal in minutes. Just heat and serve with your favorite side dish then pull leftover meat from the bone to create a soup or hearty French Cassoulet. Made with White Pekin Duck.

All Maple Leaf Farms ducks are raised with care on family-owned farms.

  • Fully Cooked
    • Simple to cook - heat and serve
    • Total 6 lbs
    • Frozen product shipped in dry ice and ice packs

    Handling:
    Within the box you may find dry ice. Always handle dry ice with care and use a protective cloth or leather gloves whenever touching it. An oven mitt or towel will work. If touched briefly it is harmless, but prolonged contact with the skin will cause injury similar to a burn. KEEP AWAY FROM CHILDREN.

    See our handy Cooking Instructions for tips and preparation.

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    Roasted Duck Leg-Fully Cooked - 4 lb

    $119.99 Price Includes Shipping

    Roasted Duck Legs - Fully Cooked - 6 x 2 packs (12 legs x minimum 5 oz/leg)
    Total 4 lbs (12 legs total)
    Fully Cooked

    Product Descriptions:
    Dinner is ready in minutes with our Roasted Duck Legs from Maple Leaf Farms. Our lightly seasoned roasted legs are oven roasted until tender and juicy with a mild, delicious flavor. Heat and serve with your favorite sauce then pull leftover meat from the bone to create a sandwich, top pasta or add protein to a salad. Made with White Pekin duck.

    All Maple Leaf Farms ducks are raised with care on family-owned farms.

    • Fully cooked
    • Simple to cook - heat and serve
      • Cooked in juices provide a rich, succulent taste
      • 4 lbs
      • Frozen product shipped in dry ice and ice packs

      Handling:
      Within the box you may find dry ice. Always handle dry ice with care and use a protective cloth or leather gloves whenever touching it. An oven mitt or towel will work. If touched briefly it is harmless, but prolonged contact with the skin will cause injury similar to a burn. KEEP AWAY FROM CHILDREN.

      See our handy Cooking Instructions for tips and preparation.

      View the Nutritional Info .

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      Duck Leg Combo Pack - 5 lb

      $124.49 Price Includes Shipping

      All Natural Duck Leg Confit - Fully Cooked - 3 x 2 packs (6 legs x 8 oz/leg)
      Roasted Duck Legs - Fully Cooked - 3 x 2 packs (6 legs x minimum 5 oz/leg)
      Total 5 lbs (12 legs total)
      Fully Cooked

      Product Description:

      Roasted Duck Leg - Dinner is ready in minutes with our Roasted Duck Legs from Maple Leaf Farms. Our lightly seasoned roasted legs are oven roasted until tender and juicy with a mild, delicious flavor. Heat and serve with your favorite sauce then pull leftover meat from the bone to create a sandwich, top pasta or add protein to a salad. Made with White Pekin duck.

      Duck Leg Confit - Duck Legs that are seasoned with garlic, onion and spices then slowly cooked in their own fat, our All-Natural Duck Leg Confit from Maple Leaf Farms offers a gourmet meal in minutes. Just heat and serve with your favorite side dish then pull leftover meat from the bone to create a soup or hearty French Cassoulet. Made with White Perkin Duck.

      All Maple Leaf Farms ducks are raised with care on family - owned farms.

      • Fully cooked
      • Simple to cook - heat and serve
        • Locked in juices provide a rich, succulent taste
        • Total 5 lbs
        • Frozen product shipped in dry ice and ice packs

        Handling:
        Within the box you may find dry ice. Always handle dry ice with care and use a protective cloth or leather gloves whenever touching it. An oven mitt or towel will work. If touched briefly it is harmless, but prolonged contact with the skin will cause injury similar to a burn. KEEP AWAY FROM CHILDREN.

        See our handy Cooking Instructions for tips and preparation.

        View the Nutritional Info .

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        The Ultimate Fish Taco Kit ( 8 boxes )

        $129.99 Price Includes Shipping

        Our fish taco kits are sure to delight all the family. Using the Joey's Seafood Restaurant fish taco kit recipe we deliver amazing taste in every bite. We supply the fish, tortillas and sauces. You add the cabbage, lime and cheese as desired. Our tacos are simple to cook and prepare with full instructions on every pack.

        • Best quality fish tacos - more fish and less batter
        • Each box makes 5 fish tacos
        • Made with Wild Pollock - Marine Stewardship Council compliant
        • Total 567 g (20 oz) per box
        • 8 boxes, 40 tacos (4.54 kg = 10 lbs) per case
        • Simple to prepare and overn ready - thaw, bake and serve
        • Frozen product shipped in dry ice

        Within the box you may find dry ice. Always handle dry ice with care and use a protective cloth or leather gloves whenever touching it. An oven mitt or towel will work. If touched briefly it is harmless, but prolonged contact with the skin will cause injury similar to burn. KEEP AWAY FROM CHILDREN.

        See our handy Cooking Instructions for tips and preparations.

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        Catelli Butchers' Blend Meatball / Meatloaf Mix

        $127.99 Price Includes Shipping

        1/3 (33%) equal portions of beef, pork and veal
        80 / 20 lean to fat ratio
        5 x 2 lb. bags
        Total 10 lbs

        Product Description:
        Catelli Brothers has been supplying families with the highest quality veal available since 1946. Growing up, one of Tony and Jim Catelli's favorites meals was their mom's famous meatballs. Making meatballs, just like Mama Catelli used to make, has never been easier. This Butchers' Blend of equal parts beef, pork, and veal means that all you have to do is add your favorite seasonings and ingredients to make the perfect meatballs, meatloaf and bolognese sauce or a number of different items. With this easy to use, ready to season blend of high-quality proteins, dinner will be on the table faster than you can say Mangia!

        Handling:
        Within the box you may find dry ice. Always handle dry ice with care and use a protective cloth or leather gloves whenever touching it. An oven mitt or towel will work. If touched briefly it is harmless, but prolonged contact with the skin will cause injury similar to a burn. KEEP AWAY FROM CHILDREN.

        Instruction upon receiving product:

        • Open immediately upon arrival
        • Packing should be intact (no damaged seal, leaks, etc.)
        • Frozen product that has thawed should not be re-frozen
        • Product should be refrigerated (if plan immediate use) or frozen (for future use) upon receiving.

        Preparation and Cooking Tips:
        The versatility of the Butchers' Blend Mix is huge! For a variety of different recipes, visit www.catellibrothers.com/recipes and select a cut as "Ground".

        Shipping & Terms:
        Standard shipping via UPS Ground is included in the cost. Express shipping options are also available - please contact us for details. The estimated delivery time will be approximately 4 - 8 business days form the time of order. Orders received Wednesday, Thursday and Friday will not ship until the following Monday.

        Delivery is not available on National Holidays.

        *Delivey is not available on Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico without expedited freight.

        Contact us at 1-877-462-3188 or [email protected]

        Ingredients: Beef, Pork and Veal meat

        Nutrition Panel:

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        Levoni Roasted Italian Porchetta

        Sold out Price Includes Shipping

        Half Roasted Porchetta - 7.7 lb
        Fully Cooked
        Totally boneless

        Product Description:
        Levoni Porchetta is a traditional Italian cured meat. It is a fully cooked and roasted, seasoned cured pork made in Italy from the finest ingredients. It contains two half pork loins that are wrapped in defatted pork belly and seasoned with aromatic herbs. Levoni Porchetta is cooked in steam and then roasted in a dry oven to deliver a rich, mouth-watering experience. Levoni uses only natural spices and flavours.

        All Levoni pork is raised with care on family-owned farms from pigs born, bred and processed in Italy for complete "farm to fork" traceability. Made true to traditional Italian recipes for over 100 years.

        • Fully cooked
        • Totally boneless
        • Simple to cook - heat and serve
        • 7.7 lbs
        • No added milk proteins
        • Refrigerated product shipped with ice paks

        Handling:
        Refrigerate immediately upon receipt. Within the box you may find ice paks so handle with care. Keep refrigerated.

        Preparation and Cooking Tips:
        Keep in bag in refrigerator until ready to heat. Remove from bag before heating.

        Conventional oven: Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees F. Place the porchetta on an elevated rack in a pan. Heat for up to 1 hour, then slice and enjoy!

        Shipping & Terms:
        Standard shipping via UPS Ground is included in the cost. Express shipping options are also available - please contact us for details. The estimated delivery time will be approximately 4-8 business days form the time of order. Orders received Wednesday, Thursday and Friday will not ship until the following Monday.

        Delivery is not available on National Holidays.

        *Delivery is not available to Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico without expedited freight.

        Contact us at 1-877-462-3188 or [email protected]

        Ingredients: Pork, Water, Salt, Sugar, Flavours, Sodium ascorbate, Seasonings (yeast, salt), Sodium Nitrite


        Cooking Turducken

        Method

        1) Instead of making your turkey terrine from scratch, you can buy one from a specialty grocer on the internet from Hebert’s. They average about 15 pounds and can feed about 25 people after shrinkage and waste. I ordered two from my butcher once, and they were ready for pickup in a week at about $75 each. If you buy online, shipping with dry ice in a styrofoam box can double the price.

        2) Then the problems began. Because turduckens are such a solid mass, they take at least a week to defrost in the fridge. Do not set it on the counter to defrost or you will surely turn it into a salmonella incubator.

        3) Once it is defrosted, loosen the top layer of skin by sticking your hand between the skin and breast meat being careful not to rip the skin. Insert strips of bacon under the skin to add moisture to the white meat, and since when did a little bacon make things worse?

        4) Preheat your smoker or grill to 225 to 250°F. Low and slow at 225 to 250°F is the best way to keep the turkey portion from drying out, but you must take it up to at least 170°F internal temp for safety. A little smoke is nice too.

        5) Put it on a rack over a pan of water. That will add moisture to the atmosphere and help keep it from drying out. The pan will also catch drippings for gravy. Check the pan during the cook to make sure there is always at least 1/4″ water in there. Even so, it is easy to dry out the outer layer, but it can be moistened with gravy from the very tasty pan drippings, but the fact is that no amount of gravy will tenderize it if you overcook it or cook it too fast.

        6) When your big old dodo bird is finished, use turkey lifters or well insulated gloves to gently lift it onto a cutting board. Cover it loosely with foil to keep it warm.

        7) Pour the drippings into a tall narrow container like a pitcher. Leave it untouched for about 5 minutes to let the fat float to the surface and then skim most of it off. Now reheat the remaining liquid. Taste it and if you wish, cook it down to make it richer, but it should not need salt. I do not recommend adding flour to make a thick gravy. In fact, because so much cornbread has probably gotten into the drippings, you may want to run it through a fine mesh strainer to clarify it a bit. Keep the gravy thin so when you pour it over the meat it will penetrate.

        8) Carving is also a pain. Begin by removing the turkey thigh and drumsticks and wings. They thighs are easy to remove, but wings are hard to remove without pulling apart the loaf, so make sure your knife is sharp and take your time. It helps to have an electric knife, but a sharp long chef’s knife will do. Slicing the big boneless loaf one expects to get a nice layered look, but the ends are not layered, so they will be disappointing. Start by cutting across the midsection and then cut slices in both directions. That’s how to get the layered look. Expect the stuffing to crumble.

        9) Pour the gravy over the top, especially on the turkey breasts.

        Related articles

        Published On: 2/9/2014 Last Modified: 3/10/2021


        The early modern precursor to turducken: Adapting an old recipe to make mini pies

        “Take a turkey and bone him, stick him all over the breast with cloves, season him with mace, pepper, and salt, lard it with bacon, fill the corners of the pie with force meat balls, and put a duck in his belly.”

        “Take a turkey and bone it and stick his breast with cloves. Season it with pepper, salt, mace, and lard. Then season a duck to put in the turkey’s belly then lay it in the pie. Fill the corners with force meat balls and put in good store of butter. Close it and bake it.”

        Pies like these were usually hand-raised (without the aid of a mold or pan) using a thick, sturdy hot-water crust, similar to the pork pies still consumed widely in Britain today. The challenge of hand-raising an enormous pie like this one no doubt added to the air of lavish spectacle which, as Elisa Tersigni noted in last week’s blog post, was central to the experience of the early modern banquet.

        The thickness and density of the crust would also have helped to preserve the meat inside against spoiling. In a recipe for “A Christmas Goose Pie” from 1837, the American cookbook author Eliza Leslie noted that “if the weather is cold, and they are kept carefully covered up from the air, they will be good for two or three weeks the standing crust assisting to preserve them.”

        It seems likely, then, that the Thanksgiving turducken actually began life as a gigantic meat pie of the sort that was often sent as a gift between wealthy English households. Nutritionally dense and seasoned with expensive spices, these pies served a dual function as both a hearty and warming winter dish and an extravagant gesture of seasonal goodwill.

        Recreating the pie

        I made two major changes in adapting this recipe. Firstly, instead of deboning and stuffing the poultry, I chose to purchase a pre-assembled turducken. Secondly, rather than attempting to hand-raise what I knew would be a truly enormous crust, I decided to bake the pie in a roasting pan that was both wide and deep enough to hold the bird. This was certainly cheating. In this case, the use of a roasting pan resulted in a pie that was likely lower and flatter than the recipe author intended, but also far less likely to collapse.

        The major challenge remaining was to ensure that the meat was cooked through to a safe temperature without ending up with a charred crust – or, worse still, the dreaded ‘soggy bottom.’ Hoping to avoid both of these problems, I sought advice from historical food recreation expert Stephen Schmidt, lead researcher for the Manuscript Cookbooks Survey.

        Following Stephen’s advice, I ended up baking the pie for just over six hours at 300°F and using a meat thermometer to check for doneness. Because I was nervous about the whole thing collapsing when I removed it from the pan, I made the bottom and sides of the crust extra thick.

        As a result, while the exterior of the finished pie was a rich and flaky golden brown, and the meat roasted to perfection, the thicker parts of the pie crust soaked up a good deal of juice from the cooked birds and so remained moist – safe to eat (and delicious!), but perhaps not up to the exacting standards of The Great British Bake Off’s Paul Hollywood.

        Fortunately, early modern cooks were much more tolerant of a soggy bottom. They even had a term for it – the seventeenth-century courtier Sir Kenelm Digby, for instance, advised cooks to make their meat-pie crusts “pretty thick upwards towards the brim, that it may be there pudding crust.”

        Perhaps, then, rather than being a baking faux-pas, this is just another example of how culinary tastes and expectations have shifted over time. Early modern cooks clearly loved their pudding crusts, soaked through with juices and deliciously moist – in 1691, the poet Thomas Brown even penned a couplet praising the “Dear Pudding Crust of Turkey Pye.”

        Making this dish was, in all honesty, a lot of work. While the finished product was genuinely delicious, the process was both time-consuming and labor-intensive. For those who’d like to try something a little more straightforward, I’ve developed a recipe for miniature turducken pies which is loosely inspired by Dorothy Stone’s recipe. This is an easy and fun recipe that can be made in less than two hours, and which preserves most of the textures and flavors of the original. You can make the filling from scratch, or using cold leftovers from a holiday meal.

        Recipe: Mini Turducken Pies

        Ingredients

        For the hot water crust:
        • 3 cups all-purpose flour
        • 2⁄3 cup lard or vegetable shortening
        • ½ cup unsalted butter (and a small amount extra to grease the pan)
        • ¾ teaspoon salt
        • ½-1 cup hot water
        • 1-2 eggs (for egg wash)
        For the turducken filling:
        • 1-2 lbs turkey/duck/chicken meat, chopped small (or leftovers from a roast)
        • 2-3 strips bacon or turkey bacon, chopped small (optional)
        • Stuffing (optional – why not try our recipe for early modern stuffing?)
        • Cranberry sauce (optional)
        • 1 tsp long pepper* or black pepper
        • ½ tsp nutmeg
        • ½ tsp cloves
        • 1 tsp marjoram
        • ½ tsp sage
        • ½ tsp rosemary
        • ½ tsp thyme
        • 2 tsp butter
        • Salt, to taste

        * Long pepper was used frequently in early modern cooking. While today it can still be found in some specialist grocery stores, it can also be substituted for the more common black pepper.


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