New recipes

Explore the Lesser-Known Side of the Famed Party Locale, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Explore the Lesser-Known Side of the Famed Party Locale, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Here are five destinations that don’t include re-living your Spring Break vacations

El Arco is one of Cabo San Lucas' most famous landmarks.

Cabo San Lucas is certainly known for its wild party scene, but there is plenty to do and see without pulling an all-night rager. You’re never too far from the picturesque coastline, but many people don’t consider the fact that a lot of Mexico’s beaches, though gorgeous, aren’t swimmable.

That said, if you’re looking to seamlessly plan an adventure to Cabo San Lucas yourself, check out CheapCaribbean’s website where there a million different ways to plan, book, and pay for your trip. Aside from the ability to plan your vacation by budget or by a payment plan, you can also talk to a real person to help you step by step through the process.

These vacation-planning pros are CheapCaribbean’s beach expert travel agents. Each “beachologist” is trained on specific destinations and can answer any questions you may have. Like which beaches are the best for fishing or tanning? What restaurant has the most authentic Mexican food?

I had the opportunity to take a city tour of Los Cabos via Amstar DMC, and here are the highlights of the day (yes, tequila was involved).

Glass Blowing Factory
Visiting the glass blowing factory was a much cooler experience that I initially thought it would be. Though the factory was boiling hot (thanks to the open fire pits, which is what melts the glass), watching these masters heat the colorful glass to create intricate works of art was incredible. The heated glass may have well been taffy given how easily the artisans were able to pull and mold the molten hot material. The shop was filled with hundreds of different types of glass-blown artwork — everything from figurines, earrings, and cocktail stirrers, to kitchenware and ornaments.

Misión de San José del Cabo
The area of San Jose del Cabo is rich in culture and highlights the beautiful architecture of this region. One of the spots we visited was the Iglesia San José del Cabo, founded by Jesuit priests in 1733. This church is gorgeous and has been preserved in its original structure. It maintains a white and cream façade that stands out against the bright blue sky and palms. Moreover, this historic place is one where the community still goes to celebrate its faith and religion.

Tequila Tasting
We continued our exploration of the colorful downtown area, which had a number of shops selling locally made items, bakeries, and, of course, places to taste and learn about tequila. Tequila is everywhere in Cabo! You can buy a bottle at nearly every shop, and often times you're welcomed to your accommodations with a celebratory shot. Most restaurants feature an extensive list of tequilas, as well.

Tequila tastings aren't just countless shots; but rather, sips of the agave-based liquor to allow you to actually taste its quality and more complex flavors. We tried el charro blanco, reposado, and anejo; Reserva don Armando Cristalino (aged and carbon distilled); Kalore, licor de café 20 percent alcohol; flavored sisi tequila in mango and watermelon; as well as a creamy, sweet, Santa Clara Rompooe Sabor Nuez (pecan), which is used in flan and eggnog around the holidays.

Glass-Bottom Boat Tour
One of my favorite activities of the trip was our glass-bottom boat excursion in which we geared up at the (beautiful) marina and headed out to sea to get a look at the famous rock formations at Land's End, including El Arco, one of the most iconic Cabo San Lucas attractions. The water is an intense blue and the views were picture-perfect.

The boat has a literal glass bottom that allows you to see the bright, tropical fish beneath. While boating around the Sea of Cortez, you're also greeted by giant, sunbathing sea lions. These guys are super friendly here and are always on the lookout for a feeding opportunity. The rock formations are epic. You have the opportunity to see Pelican Rock, Neptune's Finger, Lover's and Divorce Beach. My only suggestion: Bring Dramamine if you tend to get sea sick!

Lunch at El Coral
After a full day of adventures, we sat down at El Coral in downtown Cabo San Lucas and indulged in an authentic Mexican midday meal. The restaurant was very colorful and artistically designed. From each wooden chair's unique paint job and design to the mural paintings cover the walls, this was a lively restaurant. We even were serenaded by a mariachi band with guitars and accordions.


For more travel news, click here.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Be brave and catch the Cabo wave

There was something in the warm Cabo air that made me brave. I stood at the edge of the “Cabo Wave” catamaran in my new swimsuit and my life jacket. For some reason I hadn’t realized until that minute that I was going to have to jump if I wanted to snorkel. I had never snorkeled before and ordinarily, I’m not a jumper. I’m a big toe in the water type of person. I don’t look before I leap – I just…don’t leap. I considered my options. I could go back to the top deck of the boat and have a margarita. I could feign illness. No one from my group was paying attention to me, the last one to get in the water. I could easily do either of these. Or, I could confront the fear and just jump off the boat. I took a deep breath, lifted my feet from the wet boat deck, and flung myself forward.

Twenty-four hours earlier I had been on a plane, excited about my first trip to Baja California Sur, and, more specifically to Los Cabos. I had been to Mexico many times before, but this was a brand new adventure for me. I happened to be visiting the vacation spot during the sixth annual Los Cabos International Film Festival, a celebration of North American film with an emphasis on projects from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada, so I knew there would be plenty

As we flew southward for a brief three hours, I could see the capes for which the area had been named. I was told Los Cabos was merely a beach strung together by a bunch of hotels, but I discovered it was so much more. The word “hotel” doesn’t even begin to cover the establishments I encountered. I stayed at Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, an adults-only, all-inclusive resort like no other. In addition to its luxurious lodgings and gourmet dining, they had group activities like water aerobics and events like a casino night and a night of Mexican culture that included fire-dancing.

Café Des Artistes at the JW Marriott featured some of the finest dining I have experienced. The atmosphere was also at once both calming and disarming. The water glasses were handmade and the dining area was crowned by what appeared to be hand-blown glass fixtures hanging from the ceiling. There was a level of comfort there that made me willing to dive into cuisines I wouldn’t ordinarily indulge in, like the Traditional Prawn and Pumpkin Cream Soup which was added to the menu twenty-six years ago by Des Artistes’ mastermind Chef Thierry Blouet.

While the restaurants fed my body, the area architecture fed my mind. One architectural highlight was the One&Only Palmilla. This charming locale was originally built in 1956 as a home for pilot Don Abelardo Rodríguez, son of Abelardo L. Rodríguez, a former general in the Mexican Revolution who later became Mexico’s president.

Though the property has expanded since the 50s and has been acquired by the world-famous One&Only brand, the architectural integrity has been kept intact, and the three original structures Rodríguez built remain. I had drinks by one of these three originals, a stunning chapel which hosts weddings with guests from around the globe. The chapel is topped with an enormous cross and has the uniquely-Catholic feature of grotesque saint images adorning the outer wall. It looked like a scene from a movie about the Mexico of a time long-gone, not a tangible edifice that I could reach out and grasp.

Not enough praise can be showered on the resorts. They not only provide world-class service to their guests, but they also provide much-needed service to others and the environment. Paradisus Los Cabos hosts an art auction every Friday to benefit UNICEF and also has a wildlife conservation program which attempts to increase the number of sea turtles that survive until adulthood. This, and programs like it, earned Mexico an award in the Biodiversity and Fauna category of the Premios LatinoAmérica Verde. They won for their Program for Protection, Conservation and Research of Natural Resources and Wildlife and the Paradisus staff proudly shows off the trophy, made from recycled material. Los Cabos is currently the only place in the world that has private hotels assisting with conservation efforts — a perfect marriage of capitalism and environmentalism.

I have more positive things to say about Los Cabos than I have space for in this article. I haven’t even begun to touch on the art and film scene (Intagrafía, an art gallery run by Nacho Gallardo in the San José del Cabo area, is doing amazing work), the casual dining scene (Pancho’s offers a great lunch menu where you can down a shot of rattlesnake tequila), or the nightlife. To anyone who’s curious about taking a weekend trip to Los Cabos for the first time, I have this advice: be brave take the leap.


Watch the video: THIS IS HEAVEN - SIDEMEN BALI LUXURIOUS BALI HOTEL (December 2021).